Oceans of Opportunity

Sea trials and tribulations

Some will say that every day out to sea is better than a day at the office. I’ve had my share of bad days at sea for certain, but today was certainly one of those good days. Calm seas, good company, and putting some new technology to the test.



Dr. Vincent Pieribone (left), Dr. Gruber (right), and Brennan Phillips (center) observing the video feed from the new ROV.

The mission was a first sea trial for Dr. David Gruber’s Seaeye Falcon ROV, configured specifically for his cutting edge work on biofluorescence and bioluminescence in the marine environment. The work is emerging as a focal point for both public appeal in the sciences, as well as the pinnacle of pure discovery. The discovery of novel sources of fluorescent proteins, and potentially new fluorescent proteins in the environment has deep implications in human health.The portal into this exciting world can be found at www.luminescentlabs.org.

The portal into this exciting world can be found at www.luminescentlabs.org.
 
I’m excited about the work from a few perspectives. First is that evolutions of the field work stand to justify the human element in exploration of more ‘extreme environments’ – that puts people like me to work!. Second, is that coupling the new technology embedded within the ROV with the human element provides unsurpassed access to regions of ocean space, and its discovery potential – potentially unlocking a massive future body of work that could span decades. In many ways, the stars are aligning.
 
Dr. David Gruber (left) and Dr. Vincent Pieribone (right).
 
While today’s sea trial was exactly that – a trial – it was a first step. It brought together a team that in today’s world often only connects through cyberspace – ideas dreamed up, new courses charted, and plans set in motion – making the world turn just one step closer to ‘a new life in the sea’.
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