the Life Aquatic [of the working diver]

the Life Aquatic [of the Working Diver]

Working underwater is just plain hard work – hard on the body, and on the mind. Yet, for centuries, a community has evolved that embraces this work as its own. 

Divers are their own unique breed, with each bringing special skills and expriences into the mix to keep the work moving forward. Day in and day out, their ‘Life Aquatic’ is full of life lessons that are often learned the hard way. Some of the greatest minds in human history have lived this Life Aquatic – from Alexander the Great to Cousteau.

Ocean Opportunity Inc. treats diving itself as a field of study, and embraces the social and cultural challenges that come with this community as its strengths. We work hard to improve the Life Aquatic for all working divers through new technologies, new techniques, and sometimes just simple information exchange to help others learn how to get it done just a little bit easier than the last time.

After all, the work is hard enough, so we may as well be working together.

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Read More about Evolving the Life Aquatic

Oxygen Treatment Hoods | a Gift from the Sea

With over 20 years of diving behind me, the one absolute I’ve come to appreciate is that sea has and will continue to reveal many, many gifts for humanity. The ocean gives us all so much, whether immediately on our horizons or not – it truly is the lifeblood of our planet. The ocean provides a source for recreation, food, trade route for commerce, a source for natural resources, new medicines, carbon sequestration, oxygen, and…pressure. It should be no surprise that divers are the best and most prolific voices for the ocean – when we are immersed within it, we...
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a case for oxygen-only rebreathers in our past, present, and future

Some legs of the journey are predictable, and others just aren’t. I first got the deep diving bug almost 20 years ago, and at that time (circa start of the 21st century) deep diving for the masses meant suffering through nitrogen narcosis, and severely limited bottom times given only open-circuit tech being in the mainstream. For the fortunate few who were ahead of the game, helium was accessible, though far from commonplace. Even further from the day to day was the use of mixed-gas rebreathers. Sure, there were a few early adopters, and those more elite individuals and groups just...
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How Dare You…?

Like it or not, the little girl has a good point. Greta Thunberg’s recent United Nations address was strong, clear, and consistent. Some elder folk are probably hearing her soapbox speech and the response is an ‘aww isn’t she cute’, and that’s exactly what’s wrong – ‘how dare you’ is exactly right. It’s easy to take life as a ticket to ride out three quarter of a century or so until whatever comes next and dismiss the unbalance here on Earth as someone’s else’s problem. The fact is that ALL of it IS our problem. A sustainable humanity should be...
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who’s in the dive team?

I’ve had to switch gears in between diving modes quite a bit as of late, so am re-hashing this post (originally from 2013) to keep some fresh perspective out there on the subject of dive team composition… The overwhelming majority of dives I have made have been alone  – or at least I’m alone in the water. I first started solo diving at age 16, very soon after first learning to dive, and out of necessity as I was quickly cast into a summer job cleaning boats, recovering lost items, changing chains, and so on. These light commercial activities don’t...
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In Oceans Deep | a review

Bill Streever’s “In Oceans Deep” hits the nail on the head, referencing from the very beginning that the book tackles “humanity’s presence beneath the waves”, and later concluding that “…a key role remains for manned expeditions…inspiration”. Embodied within those two sentiments is a chronicle of several pivotal moments in human intervention’s history and across various modes of diving – free-diving, manned submersibles, saturation diving, undersea habitation, atmospheric suits, and robotics as human proxies. Albeit unfortunate, the aquatic world is not full to the brim with writers, particularly those who can convey elements of historical fact through storytelling that is interwoven...
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Happy Birthday Blog to Me

For those following my various blogs and bramblings, yes, I am still very much on a Blog hiatus, though felt compelled to make a few short key strokes today…seeing as it’s my birthday and I do love to write, I may as well write. As many of my days go, it was spent on on and underwater, grinding it out to make a decent living and with the very fortunate perspective of experiencing our planet in a unique way for the bulk of the day. The day started with me jumping in my boat and seeing a very shiny object...
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New Book : Closed Circuit, Open Sourced

During my recent Blogging hiatus, I shifted my time allocated towards writing to bottom out a long overdue book project., and am pleased to share here that ‘Closed Circuit | Open Sourced’  is now published and available on Amazon.com. I’ve been diving closed circuit rebreathers for almost 20 years, having realized the strong potential for the technology to open new doors for humans operating beneath the sea. I’ve been somewhat fortunate to be what they call ‘an early adopter’, having moved toward their use at the start of the 21st century during a time when the technology was still considered...
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Out of Sight, Out of Mind

They say “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure”, and that may well be the case for pickers galore, or even for we subaquatic pickers – wreck hunters, salvors, and history nerds. But it’s not all fun and games… In some cases, underwater wreckage is actually a watery grave, and must be treated with the utmost respect. In others, it’s a mass of plundered goods. And in still others – it is truly, utterly, and sadly trash. We’ve been pleased to do our limited part in shedding some light on underwater pollution over the past couple of years. In fact,...
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