Oceans of Opportunity

thriving within our ‘space’

'A New Life in the Sea' by Michael LombardiA recent New York Times piece discussed the many complications, ongoing research, and future direction
of long duration human spaceflight and travel.

http://nyti.ms/1jY8yR4

From physiology to psychology, living and working within not only a confined space, but with finite resources that must be very carefully managed (no binging for a late night snack!), and in a physical gravitational environment that does little to help keep us put together like here on Earth is all very dynamic and challenging.

The fact that we humans have evolved here on Earth speaks to that we have evolved under very precise and defining conditions. Most notably is pressure. Pressure keeps us put together, facilitates fluid and other transport mechanisms within our bodies, and maintains the atmosphere and environment we live in and take for granted each and every day. Like I’ve said before – it all comes down to physics.

Interestingly, forthcoming trips to Mars, longer duration excursions to the International Space Station, or something else out away from our planet requires very real human adaptation to the alterations of our physical environment, while maintaining a physiological balance to ensure survivability, and sustainability. That is no easy task.

Much like extended duration underwater exploration and potential habitation, we have two fundamental options, where 1) we protect the human from the environment, or 2) we alter the human. Both are science non-fiction in many ways, and within the realm of reason as we trek forward with considering new frontiers in human exploration – both short and long term.

There is no better time than now to revisit human frontier limit exploration here on Earth, as this close to home experimentation will surely influence our motives in human space exploration and beyond – bringing steps for humanity’s future within acute focus.

My call out to you is to take bold but well calculated steps, and stand behind new directions. The ability to excel and thrive within our own space is surely needed should we consider the space beyond.

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