the Ocean State

Dive In, to an Ocean State of Mind

Our Lombardi Undersea Resource Center, or LURC, in Middletown Rhode Island provides the physical hub and incubation space for developing new technologies and techniques for human ocean exploration. Further, much of OO’s creative development work takes place from within the walls of several coffee shops located in Providence’s East Side.

Despite the deep influences of the Island Nation, our roots are at home in the Ocean State of Rhode Island, USA. Its energetic and flourishing maritime industry largely influenced our upbringing, and the coastal community has cradled our humble beginnings. Further, the Ocean State’s capital city of Providence is at the heart of an intellectual engine that makes up the New England innovation sector.

The Ocean State has its own history in exploration with Narragansett Bay being explored by Giovanni di Verrazzano in the 1524. Further, Rhode Island is the settlement retreat of 17th century separatists for religious freedom, interestingly, quite contrary to the 18th century loyalists that settled the Island Nation.

With field programs taking us throughout the United States, the South Pacific ,Europe, the Caribbean, Hong Kong, and as far as Antarctica, we continually think about impacts at a global scale – recognizing that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction that helps to sculpt the world we live in.

However, it is our local actions that we embrace as our strengths, and provides the many tools, techniques, and leverage to reach out more globally.

Be it advocacy for local shark populations, extending the accessible range of local dive sites, creating artificial reefs, or engaging the humanities community with our work, OO is proud to help the Ocean State stand tall and up to its name.

Help Us Give Rhode Island Diving a Boost

Your donations help us to promote an ‘Ocean State’ of Mind for all citizens of our Blue Planet.

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Read More to Open your Ocean State of Mind

Lurking in the Shadows of September 11

Today will forever be one of those days where every American will reminisce a bit and contemplate where and how we are moving forward. In my case, today the dive supervisor reminded me that this was the 4th anniversary of Lyle passing away. Lyle Smith was the owner of Coastal Diving in Middletown, RI – the guy that gave me a chance to cut my teeth in commercial diving, and who I then worked with for a solid 15 years; or rather learned many life lessons with for 15 years while out there taking the sea head on day after day and learning how to make a living out on the water. Lyle left us the same way he lived – hitting it hard out...
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Boring worms aren’t that boring

Ahh, the glamour and high life promised to we commercial divers – international travel, becoming part of fabled sea stories, mega-buck paychecks –  boils down an inconvenient truth; boring worms aren’t (or at least shouldn’t) be that boring. For every one of those fabled sea stories that turns into a reality, there are at least a hundred mundane tales grounded in the reality that commercial diving ain’t all it’s cracked up to be… There are several routine tasks inshore divers face, and certainly routine conditions encountered while performing those tasks. Last week’s (and next week’s) work involved cutting several hundred timber piles just above the mudline to make the waterfront more aesthetically pleasing for a condo development. The piles we part of a previous pier...
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a diver’s life hangs in the balance

Acceptable risk. This is something that is widely variable from person to person, from diver to diver, and can ebb and flow based on the current state of affairs, and even day to day state of mind. Earlier this week, while conducting a fairly routine activity underwater – fully accepting the risk – I was left literally hanging in the balance…and there I was. To set the stage, we were out doing our routine mooring work. For those not in tune with mooring work, it means alot of diving in muddy harbors, lots of ups and downs, humping around heavy chain, breaking old rusty shackles in poor visibility, and generally breaking your back day after day. Why do it? Well, it’s some of the best...
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Making waves, in Compost!

Yesterday, our local news featured a piece about Stop & Shop’s regional compost facility in Assonet, MA. This is such an amazing facility, and hopefully becomes a model of efficiency for other large companies: http://turnto10.com/news/local/stop-shop-facility-turns-food-into-energy Some might ask how in the world this seems to excite me? Well, environmental advocacy aside, I’ve been up close and personal with this place – being one of three to dive in! I’ve done some cool projects, but this one stood out, at least within the last few years…not only was it cool, but it was hot at the same time… A stand pipe located in the digestion tank had been compromised at a joint adjacent to where the pipe penetrated the tank walls through a flange. As much...
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the new 60 for 60 in diving

This past week I made a dive that I hadn’t made in some time – 60 [feet] for 60 [minutes]. This is one of those marks within diving space that is well-recognized given the US Navy dive table’s no decompression limit at 60 feet…you guessed it – 60 minutes. The depth isn’t a challenge, even for the modestly trained sport diver. However, the challenge is that the time at depth places air consumption right on the edge of the dive being capable of being conducted with a single cylinder. At that edge also lies the potential to enter required decompression. Knowing all of this, and considering the planned dive was anticipated as an arduous one, I carried two cylinders. Again, not too out of the...
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diving in the background

This week was one of those weeks – a marathon stretch of hard mud diving every day which equated to just shy of 30 hours underwater within a 5 day stretch, with one day including a 7 hour dive. I’ve had lots of weeks like this, for better or worse, and they always manage to bring forward some of the harsh realities of the trade, while leaving the glamour of diving hidden in the background. So, what the heck was I doing for 30 hours down there? Well, I was being part underwater engineer, part underwater carpenter, and part underwater trash man. We were tasked with installing several thousands of pounds of foam flotation to a new concrete floating dock to make it more level...
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the ups and downs of mooring work

Tis the season – water is still cold, brisk morning starts, and a glimpse of spring come afternoon – and the long days out on the water have kicked off. This time of year is a big focus on one thing…mooring work. What is mooring work? Well, for those landlubber readers, a mooring itself is the permanent anchor set out on the water where folks will tie up a boat that stays on the water for some period of time. Its anatomy consists of some type of heavy bottom tackle, most often a ‘mushroom’ anchor, though at time concrete blocks, or helical screws hydraulically driven into the bottom; a shot of heavy ‘bottom chain’, which rests on the bottom and rarely moves unless there is...
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Grant Received | Innovate RI

Very pleased to share that we received a small grant through the Rhode Island Science & Technology Advisory Council (STAC) Innovate RI Small Business Fund to officially hire our intern! We’ve been working with students from a variety of New England institutions for over a decade on everything from public relations to technology development. Last summer, we reached out to the University of Rhode Island for student engineering assistance with our Ocean Space Habitat development project, and that’s what we got. Just in the last six months, thanks to Adam Piispanen from URI, we have made progress in better understanding the mechanics of variable depth capability for our portable habitat, and have started to take a serious deep dive (no pun intended) into engineering schematics for many...
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